The Second-Generation Liberation Movement in Southern Sudan: Anti-Colonialism as a Set of Practices

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A remarkable feature of the Southern Sudanese liberation movement during the First Sudanese Civil War was its use of anti-colonial discourse and tactics. Soon into their struggle, the Southern Sudanese came to depict their situation as colonisation by the Muslim-Arab elite in Khartoum. As this article argues, this adoption of anti-colonial identity was the outcome of Southern Sudanese interaction with neighbouring Arab and African first-generation liberation movements, through which the future leaders of the Southern Sudanese liberation movement observed and absorbed the practices used against European colonialism. When the Southern Sudanese launched their liberation struggle, these practices shaped their struggle.

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Yaniv Voller

Yaniv Voller joined the school in 2016 as a Lecturer in the Politics of the Middle East. Prior to that he was a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow at the School of Social and Political Science, University of Edinburgh. He received his PhD from the London School of Economics and Political Science, where he also taught courses in the International Relations and the International History Departments.

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