Still waiting for the Bonanza: The oil business in South Sudan after 2005

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The paper examines the oil sector in South Sudan since 2005, when the historic Comprehensive Peace Agreement was reached between the Government of the former Sudan and the then rebel Sudan People’s Liberation Movement/Army. It argues that, as in many low-income countries, the benefits from the oil sector have been reaped mainly by a small number of people who control the government or have links to powerful persons in the government. The interests of ordinary people in the sector have been largely ignored. The ordinary people are still waiting for the benefits of oil extraction in this nearly two-year- old country.

Leben Nelson Moro

Director of International and Alumni Affairs at University of Juba, South Sudan
Leben Nelson Moro teaches graduate courses in the areas of development, conflict, forced migration and humanitarian affairs at the University’s Center for Peace and Development Studies. He received a Master of Public Administration at the American University in Cairo, Egypt, and Master of Science in Forced Migration and Doctor of Philosophy in Development Studies at University of Oxford, UK. He primarily conducts research on development-induced displacement and resettlement, focusing on oil, conflict, and displacement in South Sudan. He has conducted fieldwork in South Sudan, Egypt, Uganda, and Kenya. Some of the findings of his studies appeared in the Journal of Refugee Studies, St Anthony’s International Review, Forced Migration Review, New Internationalist, and Pambazuka News.

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