Reconfiguring the South Sudanese Women’s Movement

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This article examines multiple aspects that prompted the emergence and development of the women’s movement in South Sudan. It intends to outline challenges and opportunities for the women’s movement over the years. Indeed, there are numerous sociocultural, economic, political, and structural aspects that impinge on women’s collective actions and mobilization. Nevertheless, this article focuses on how the efforts of the women’s movement strived to articulate and promote critical issues related to women and gender in South Sudan that are partly constrained by three interrelated factors: its close association with the Sudan People’s Liberation Movement (splm), persistent civil wars and political instability, and donor agencies’ influence on its agenda and activities. The paper argues that, without any tangible changes in these dynamics, the women’s movement in South Sudan will not be able to simultaneously and effectively tackle practical and strategic gender concerns and interests and achieve gender equality in South Sudan.

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Jane Kani Edward

Clinical Assistant Professor, Department of African and African American Studies at Fordham University, USA
Dr. Jane Kani Edward was born and raised in southern Sudan, and educated in Sudan, Egypt and Canada. Edward received her PhD in Sociology in Education from the University of Toronto in 2004. Currently she is a Clinical Assistant Professor and Director of African Immigration Research, Department of African and African American Studies, Fordham University. She teaches courses on African history, women in Africa and contemporary African immigration to the United States. Edward’s areas of research interest center on refugee and immigrant women’s experience, human rights and education, gender, race, class and representation, gender issues in conflict and post-conflict situations, and African immigration to the United States. Dr. Edward carried out research work among southern Sudanese refugees and internally displaced persons in Egypt, Uganda and southern Sudan. She is the author of Sudanese Women Refugees: Transformations and Future Imaginings, 2007, and several book chapters and articles.

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