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Taxonomy results for: Repositories

Christians, Colonists, and Conversion: A View from the Nilotic Sudan.

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This article is an attempt to examine a number of interrelated factors which can be cited to account for the relative failure of evangelical Christianity in three pastoral, Nilotic-speaking communities of the southern Sudan, the Dinka, Nuer, and Atuot. The social context of missions was largely created by the British colonial presence, so that it…

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Local government and decentralisation in Sudan

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This article from 1983 summarizes the experience leading up to the 1981 Local Government Act, and examines the extent to which the new legislation offers an effective structure. The finance of local government, a recurrent problem in the Sudan, emerges as a critical issue, together with the future role of the Provincial Commissioner. Link to…

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Tribal Boundaries and Border Wars: Nuer-Dinka Relations in the Sobat and Zaraf Valleys, c. 1860-1976

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Nuer–Dinka relations are usually described as being based on constant mutual hostility. This article (1982) examines Nuer–Dinka relations along the Sobat and Zaraf valleys since the beginning of Nuer eastward expansion in the nineteenth century and reveals a different pattern. Conflict during the immediate Nuer conquest of Dinka territory was followed by assimilation of individual…

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The Southern Sudan Today

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In the early 1960s there was a growing movement among the people of the Southern Sudan to break away from the Sudan Republic, caused by their oppression and exploitation at the hands of the Government. To understand what was happening, this article (1963) provides a short account of the historical background, and of the political…

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The Nuer: a description of the modes of livelihood and political institutions of a Nilotic people

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First published in 1940, this study has become one of the classic works in social anthropology. The Nuer of the Southern Sudan are predominantly a pastoral people and the first part of the book describes their life as herdsmen, fishermen and gardeners. Their economic life is related to the absence of chieftainship and their democratic…

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CSRF SOUTH SUDAN