National Security Versus Basic Liberties: Human Rights Challenges in South Sudan

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This policy brief (2016) examines the current state of human rights situation in South Sudan, and the global and regional contexts that complicate it. It particularly looks at how the government of the young state could be more caring about the lives of citizens and what options the world community has in prevention and punishment of atrocities and crimes committed against the South Sudanese citizens.

Jok Madut Jok

Executive director at Sudd Institute
Jok Madut Jok is cofounder of the Sudd Institute. Born and raised in Sudan, Jok studied in Egypt and the United States. He is trained in the anthropology of health and holds a Ph.D. from the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). Jok recently joined the Government of South Sudan as undersecretary in the Ministry of Culture and Heritage. He was a J. Randolph Senior Fellow at the United States Institute of Peace and a fellow at the Rift Valley Institute. He is a Professor in the Department of History at Loyola Marymount University in California, from which he is on an extended leave. He has also worked in aid and development, first as a humanitarian aid worker and has been a consultant for a number of aid agencies. He is the author of three books and numerous articles covering gender, sexuality and reproductive health, humanitarian aid, ethnography of political violence, gender-based violence, war and slavery, and the politics of identity in Sudan. His book Sudan: Race, Religion and Violence, was published in 2007. Jok is co-editor of The Sudan Handbook, 2010.

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