Findings around cash-based programmes and conflict

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This briefing paper is based on research conducted by the Conflict Sensitivity Resource Facility (CSRF) in February and March 2018, and funded by the UK, Switzerland, Canada and the Netherlands. The full report can be found on the CSRF Research Repository.

Cash-based programmes are changing the way aid works in South Sudan. Conditional and unconditional cash transfers, grants, vouchers and work schemes are reworking shelter, food security and livelihoods, and development programmes – and they are also changing the social, economic and security contexts in which these programmes operate. Cash-based programming may interact with South Sudan’s conflicts, by channelling resources into the war economy, or burdening markets with demand which they cannot meet, or even by putting beneficiaries at risk of predatory violence. Cash-based aid also may impact traditional kinship and social safety networks. This study looks at how these interactions between cash-based programmes and conflict.

Conflict Sensitivity Resource Facility

Conflict Sensitivity Resource Facility at CSRF
Conflict sensitivity is an approach that seeks to maximise the positive impacts of humanitarian and development initiatives for peace, whilst avoiding harm.The Conflict Sensitivity Resource Facility (CSRF), initiated in 2016 by the British, Swiss and Canadian missions, supports the use of conflict sensitivity in donor strategies and programmes in South Sudan.

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