Ceasefire Monitoring in South Sudan 2014–2019: “A Very Ugly Mission”

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More than five years after South Sudan’s first ceasefire agreement, ceasefire monitors are still on the ground. The hope was that their work would help overcome the mistrust between rival factions, halt ongoing violence, and deter further violations. Drawing on interviews with monitors, combatants, politicians, civil society representatives, diplomats, peacekeepers, and others, this report examines the history of ceasefire monitoring in South Sudan and offers recommendations for donors supporting future monitoring processes in South Sudan and elsewhere.

Drawing on more than ninety interviews and written responses from ceasefire monitors, combatants, politicians, civil society representatives, international diplomats, peacekeepers, and analysts, this report reviews internationally led ceasefire monitoring in South Sudan from January 2014 to January 2019. Supported by the Middle East and Africa Center at the United States Institute of Peace, it identifies the challenges and offers recommendations for donors supporting future monitoring processes in South Sudan and elsewhere.

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Aly Verjee

Aly Verjee is a fellow of the Rift Valley Institute. He was formerly deputy and acting chief of staff of the Joint Monitoring and Evaluation Commission (JMEC), and a senior political advisor to the IGAD mediation for South Sudan.

He is author of Race Against Time (2010), a Rift Valley Institute study on the referendum in South Sudan, and Disputed Votes, Deficient Observation: The 2011 election in South Kordofan, Sudan (2011). He is a contributor to numerous newspapers and books.

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