Assembling land control after displacement: some reflections from rural Southern Sudan

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This article recounts how, in the years prior to independence in 2011, returnees successfully assembled land for inhabitation and productive use through autochthonous modes of governance, legitimation and inscription.

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Léonie Newhouse

Prior to joining the institute, Dr. Newhouse held a position as a Visiting Assistant Professor of African Studies at the Pennsylvania State University. She earned her doctorate in Geography from the University of Washington, where she focused on an ethnographic examination of the political economy of refugee return migration to South Sudan. She holds a MSc in Forced Migration from the University of Oxford, and a BS in Environmental Economics and Policy from the University of California, Berkeley. She has also held visiting positions at the Centre for Migration and Refugee Studies at the American University in Cairo and the Center for Gender and Refugee Studies at the University of California Hastings College of the Law in San Francisco.

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