Aid and complicity: the case of war-displaced Southerners in the Northern Sudan

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The paper is concerned with the unintended consequences of aid as a relation of governance: in this case, the failure of aid agencies to improve the lot of displaced Southerners living in North Sudan during the past civil war. Given the ongoing displacement of South Sudanese to Sudan some aspects of this article might again be relevant.

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Mark Duffield

Professor Emeritus at the School of Sociology, Politics and International Studies at University of Bristol, UK
Mark Duffield is former Director of the Global Insecurities Centre.He is also an Honorary Professor in the School of Government and Society, University of Birmingham.Duffield has taught at the Universities of Khartoum, Aston and Birmingham and held Fellowships and Chairs at Sussex, Leeds and Lancaster. He recently completed eight years as a member of the Scientific Board of the Flemish Peace Institute, Brussels and is a Fellow of the Rift Valley Institute, London and Nairobi.Outside of academia, during the 1980s, he was Oxfam’s Country Representative in Sudan.Duffield has advised government departments including DFID, EU (ECHO), the Swedish Ministry of Foreign Affairs, and the Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency (SIDA); also NGOs such as CAFOD, International Alert, Comic Relief and Oxfam; and UNICEF, UNOCHA, UNDP and UNHCR.His books include Global Governance and the New Wars: The Merging of Development and Security (2001, reissued in 2014 in Zed Books presitigious Critique Influence Change series) and Development, Security and Unending War: Governing the World of People (2007, reissued 2013).

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